University of Newcastle - UON reviews

(4.04) 69 reviews

University of Newcastle - UON ratings

Average ratings based on 69 reviews
Overall Rating
4.04
Job Prospects
3.97
Teachers
3.88
Course Work
4.10
Time Worthy
3.93
Money Worthy
3.80
Friend Test
4.09
Support
3.80
Facilities
4.14
Industry Contacts
3.61

More on the University of Newcastle

The University of Newcastle is based in Callaghan, Newcastle which is north of Sydney in New South Wales. They also have campuses in Ourimbah, Singapore and Sydney.

We have student reviews of Newcastle Uni across a wide range of topics including Commerce, Engineering, Arts & Law, Education, Health, IT & Science. Bachelor degrees in Engineering, Medicine and Nursing are well rated courses offered by the University.

Here are some of the common bits of feedback from students in our University of Newcastle reviews:
Time management is key (particularly Engineering, Nursing and Medicine);
Immerse yourself in Uni / course - attend all your tutorials/labs, etc - it's the best way to learn and impacts your results;
Try to chat to teachers and ask questions or get feedback;
Organise placements early and make the most of them;
Read the course book and understand exactly what you're getting into;
Get involved in Uni life, activities, clubs, societies - it's a great way to make friends and in some cases practical exposure.

Read University of Newcastle - UON Reviews

Positives: It’s just so interesting, you learn about how the mind works and what makes people do what they do

Negatives: It’s hard

My advice to future students is: STUDY and read your text book chapter before each lecture

Completing in 2021

Read more


Positives: Appeals to such a large dynamic of people and there as so many different career opportunities so a very useful degree for a range of careers one may want to pursue

Negatives: Very competitive if you plan to continue on to become a registered psychologist, some topics can be difficult for some people

My advice to future students is: Make sure you you grasp the material don’t over work yourself and balance your life and uni effectively

Completing in 2022

Read more


Positives: The lectures so far have been very approachable and they try to make the lectures interesting and put in effort to engage with the students which makes going to class enjoyable.

Negatives: I was not expecting the Psychology degree to include this much mathematical content which is required for a number of Statistics units. The main campus is at Callaghan and I am at the smaller Ourimbah campus and unfortunatly many Ourimbah students feel that there is a difference between the two locations with Callaghan having a wider variety of elective courses available on campus, more on campus facilities and more of emphasis on campus student culture.

My advice to future students is: Brush up on your math skills in preparation for the statistics units. If you a looking for an interesting elective unit I highly recommend Auslan - So far my favorite elective. In regards to the difference in campus, I like that Ourimbah is smaller so it is easier to get around campus, it is not as crowded and has free onsite parking however if you are looking to experience more of the stereotypical campus culture outside of class times with the emphasis on student events like toga parties and trivia nights you should probably consider study at Callaghan.

Completing in 2020

Read more


Positives: The subject matters are fascinating to me. I'm learning things about human behaviour and cognition that i never would have imagined. A lot of things I learn make other things in life make a lot more sense, in terms of the way people act and how I/others feel about certain things. It constantly teaches me things that are applicable in daily life, like learning how to better understand my own feelings and biases, as well as better understanding the motivations of people around me. It is giving me the ability to notice and appropriately respond to signs of poor mental health/mental illness both in myself and in my friends and family. Psychology also feels like a cutting edge field of science. It feels like one of the few areas of science that are both relevant and largely unexplored. Honestly I could (and likely will) study psychology forever.

In terms of course structure, it is also fantastic. Each subject builds on previous classes very well from a very introductory level. The lecturers are interesting and motivated enough to keep me focused and inspired, with few exceptions. The content is provided in an open-minded kind of way (e.g. there's a lot of ""here's the current best theory, but there will likely be a better one in 5 years so take it with a grain of salt""). Staff are also very understanding and accommodating when potential issues arise.

Great content, great deliver (y)

Negatives: There's a decent amount of things outside of ""how the brain works"" to study. Namely statistics. The stats classes aren't necessarily difficult, but they are very dense, which made it hard for me to manage. I am through with most of the statistics now, and I definitely learnt some interesting and practical things, but boy was it a struggle to stay motivated to study them. Psychometrics is another thing that isn't really about ""how the brain works"" that can get pretty full on. But, imo it is comparatively manageable.

The other main issue I have is the group work. I'm sure every degree has group assessments, but there is a focus on group work/dynamics, particularly in social psychology classes. But that's only really an issue for people like me who don't handle group work/forced interaction very well.

I guess I don't really have many negative things to say.

My advice to future students is: Study!! Getting into fourth year/Honours requires good grades throughout your course, so stay on top of it! If you don't want to go on to Honours, still study, because there's not much worse than having to redo a course. Especially if it's a boring one.

Also don't study psychology in an effort to solve your own mental health issues. You can't therapy yourself lol. See a professional *and* study psychology.

Also try to have/form a good idea of the type of career you want to end up in as early as possible. The possibilities are endless in psyc, so definitely do some research and be willing to pivot if something takes your fancy.

Completing in 2019

Read more


Want to study in Australia?
1000s of students use study101 every month.
"They worked with me to find good Universities in Melbourne to choose to study at." - Sam, International Student Studying in Melbourne.
We can help you find the best place to study.